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Children’s Books Inspired by the Life of Martin Luther King

“I dream of a day when people will be judged, not by the color of their skin but by the content of their character” – Martin Luther King Jr

Here are books you can read with your children inspired by the life of MLK Junior

📚Build a diverse library for diverse dialogue within your local community by recommending books to your local library.✊🏾

Tall or short, big or small, skinny or plump…every child is unique! Some children love to read, while others love to sing or dance. Some children wear glasses, while some may talk with an accent. Some children love to socialize and mingle, while others love their own space and privacy.

Every child comes with their own set of character traits and individuality, and they must be appreciated for being different yet the same. What matters is the content of their character.

Here’s a book list to inspire self-confidence in children:

It’s OK to be Different

*Gold Award Winner, Literary Titan

It’s OK to be Different written by Sharon Purtill and illustrated by Sujata Saha presents individuality. Everything about it is inspiring. Children will enjoy the fun and clever rhymes, as they are drawn in by the bright and cheerful illustrations. It is one of those books that both children and adults can enjoy, as it delivers the perfect message to young readers.

This story has effectively imparted an ever important lesson that individuality should be celebrated and not shunned. It encourages kids to accept and befriend those who are different from themselves. Showing young children that they don’t have to look alike or enjoy doing the same activities to be kind to one another.

When Martin Luther King Jr. Wore Roller Skates

 

 

Martin Luther King Jr. led the American Civil Rights Movement. But do you know what he was like as a child? From roller skating to playing football and basketball, Martin was a fun-loving child. This playful story of his childhood will help young readers connect with a historic figure and will inspire them to want to achieve greatness.

ONE LOVE

Adapted from one of Bob Marley’s most beloved songs, One Love brings the joyful spirit and unforgettable lyrics of his music to life for a new generation. Readers will delight in dancing to the beat and feeling the positive groove of change when one girl enlists her community to help transform her neighborhood for the better. Adapted by Cedella Marley, Bob Marley’s first child, and gorgeously illustrated by Vanessa Newton, this heart-warming picture book offers an upbeat testament to the amazing things that can happen when we all get together with one love in our hearts.

I HAVE A DREAM

From Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s daughter, Dr. Bernice A. King: “My father’s dream continues to live on from generation to generation, and this beautiful and powerful illustrated edition of his world-changing “I Have a Dream” speech brings his inspiring message of freedom, equality, and peace to the youngest among us—those who will one day carry his dream forward for everyone.”

On August 28, 1963, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington, Martin Luther King gave one of the most powerful and memorable speeches in our nation’s history. His words, paired with Caldecott Honor winner Kadir Nelson’s magnificent paintings, make for a picture book certain to be treasured by children and adults alike. The themes of equality and freedom for all are not only relevant today, 50 years later, but also provide young readers with an important introduction to our nation’s past.

The Power of One: Every Act of Kindness Counts

One small act of kindness can change the world. From esteemed bullying expert and author of The Invisible Boy, Trudy Ludwig and Little Elliot illustrator Mike Curato comes a tale as simple–and simply inspiring–as the golden rule.

When one child reaches out in friendship to a classmate who seems lonely, she begins a chain reaction of kindness that ripples throughout her school and her community. One kind act begets another, small good deeds make way for bigger ones, and eventually the whole neighborhood comes together to build something much greater than the sum of its parts.

As Trudy says in the final line of the book: “Acts and words of kindness DO count, and it all starts with ONE.”

Civil Rights Then and Now

This civil rights book for kids is simultaneously a guide for parents and educators who worry about broaching the topics of racism, discrimination, and prejudice. Civil Rights Then and Now: A Timeline of the Fight for Equality in America presents the reader with facts, biographies, and landmark supreme court cases in an easily digestible manner and within a historical context. The minor editorializing helps to guide readers to understand the events that have shaped the United States and then challenges them to become advocates for change. From the embarrassing origins of Slavery to the modern struggle against systemic and overt oppression, this book will spark conversations about subjects that we can no longer afford to ignore.

I am BRAVE

The littlest readers can learn about Martin Luther King, Jr., in this board book version of the New York Times bestselling Ordinary People Change the World biography.

This friendly, fun biography series focuses on the traits that made our heroes great—the traits that kids can aspire to in order to live heroically themselves. In this new board book format, the very youngest readers can learn about one of America’s icons in the series’ signature lively, conversational way. The short text focuses on drawing inspiration from these iconic heroes, and includes an interactive element and factual tidbits that young kids will be able to connect with. This volume tells the story of Martin Luther King, Jr., the civil rights leader

How Our Skin Sparkles

Read this story of Aarav who comes home one day wondering why he looks different. See how science, culture and concept enable this child being raised on the borders of multiple cultures to see himself and those around him in a new light.

The Sparkling Series books for global kids is geared to empower kids aged 5-10. Perfect for boys, girls, early readers and elementary school students. Excellent resource for counselors, parents, and teachers alike.
Diversify your library with this award-winning children’s book that talks about body positivity and inclusion.

Children's Books Inspired by the Life of Martin Luther King

References:-
www.bookdepository.com
https://books.google.com
www.goodreads.com
www.penguinrandomhouse.com
www.amazon.com

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Cyberbullying During Virtual Schooling

With most children across the country out of school full or part time due to the pandemic, parents should be able to rest easy, knowing that school bullies won’t be lurking in the hallway or at the lunch table.

But sadly, that’s not the case. Even though youth aren’t physically at school, bullying can still happen. This year, they’ll be on the other side of a computer. A click away at all times.

While new data has yet to offer insight into just how much cyberbullying has skyrocketed, parents of children who are remote learning are feeling the pain. Now, bullying has taken a shift to much more serious topics, including masks, coronavirus, politics and social justice.

With the changes 2020 has brought, one thing has remained constant: being bullied is a traumatic experience for kids. With these strategies, parents can provide comfort and support when they need it most.

Tell them they did the right thing.

Kids are often reluctant to report cyberbullying in fear they will lose their computer or device. Praise your child for coming to you, but resist the temptation to ban them from online access (which can also isolate your child from supportive friends online).

Validate their feelings.

Listen to your child, tell them you hear them and that the way they are feeling is completely understandable. Be an active participant in the conversation while also providing a shoulder to cry on.

Assure them it isn’t their fault.

There’s still a stigma attached to bullying that somehow a child brought it on themselves. Tell your child that under no circumstances did they choose to be targeted.

Remind your child that they are not alone.

Were you bullied as a child, or do you have friends or family who went through a similar situation? Articulate those stories to your child so they can see that unfortunately, they are not alone (but by no means does it make bullying right).

Restore their confidence.

Pick out some of your child’s best qualities and tell them how it makes them special. Above all, tell your child that they are loved, worthy and deserving of the best opportunities in life.

After supporting and comforting your child — the first and most important step — you can then work on putting an end to cyberbullying.

Put the cyberbully on block.

Work with your child to block any messages from the bully.

Document and save.

Collect evidence of bullying incidents by taking screenshots of hostile interactions.

Report the behaviour to your child’s school.

If the bullying situation involves classmates, let the teacher and/or administrator know. Most schools now include cyberbullying in their school’s code of conduct.

Flag the incident online.

Many school-related programs and apps have a safety page for ways to report and block another user for cyberbullying. You can also report the behaviour to your ISP.

Seek professional help if your child seems distressed or withdrawn.

Cyberbullying is a serious issue that can have extreme consequences for your child. If you notice he or she is acting differently, contact a mental health provider.

While there is no “one size fits all” approach to talking to your child and taking action regarding cyberbullying, it’s best to keep the lines of communication open with your child so they feel comfortable coming to you for support and advice. School may look a little different right now, and so does bullying, but we can show our kids that it still isn’t okay — in any format.

First published on scarymommy.com

Lori Orlinsky is a multi award-winning children’s book author, freelance writer and marketing director who lives in Chicago. Lori is the mother of two little ladies who are small but mighty. Lori is certified by the CDC in Bullying Prevention and Response Training, and is an Ambassador for the National Bullying Prevention Center. At 5″1, she wishes her children’s picture book “Being Small (Isn’t So Bad After All),” was around when she was growing up. Lori’s books are published by Mascot Books.

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