Books about Loss of a Loved One

We saw the Netflix film Over the Moon yesterday. It was very interesting culturally and concept wise since we got a sneak peak into a Chinese household, the terminology, the clothes, the food and more. It’s certainly well made, with great songs.

Concept wise it talks about death and moving on. Is it insensitive or hurtful to move on? How does one deal with it? It can be made synonymous with failure I suppose or at least that’s what the kids and I talked about.

Here is the book list that I collected from online about the topic of LOSS. Interesting reads for kids and parents to talk about a sensitive topic. Have you read any of these?

We will have a book on a similar topic coming up by Memory Germs soon. We hope to help kids understand the loss when within the family better.

Wishing those of you who have experience loss of any kind strength. Remember, what is lost is not ever forgotten.

OVER THE MOON

Twelve-year-old Mallie knows better than to dream. In Coal Top, you live the story you’re given: boys toil in the mines and girls work as servants. Mallie can’t bear the idea of that kind of life, but her family is counting on her wages to survive.

It wasn’t always this way. Before the Dust came, the people of Coal Top could weave starlight into cloth. They’d wear these dreaming clothes to sleep and wake up with the courage to seek adventure . . . or the peace to heal a broken heart. But now nothing can penetrate Coal Top’s blanket of sorrow.

So when Mallie is chosen for a dangerous competition in which daring (and ideally, orphaned) children train flying horses, she jumps at the chance. Maybe she’ll change her story. Maybe she’ll even find the magic she needs to dream again.

But the situation proves even more dangerous when Mallie uncovers a sinister mystery at the heart of Coal Top’s struggles — a mystery some powerful people will do anything to protect.

LOST

Lucy and her favorite stuffed animal, Lou, do everything together. While on a family cruise, the wind sweeps her stuffed animal off into the ocean where is lost forever. Join Lucy in a story about grief and loss, as she navigates moving forward while honoring her beloved stuffed animal.

This book helps to guide the start of a conversation about life, death, and the path to moving forward. The story discusses the ebb and flow of grief and the challenge of moving forward without losing the memories of who you lost.

The Invisible String

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“That’s impossible,” said twins Jeremy & Liza after their Mom told them they’re all connected by this thing called an Invisible String. “What kind of string?” They asked with a puzzled look to which Mom replied, “An Invisible String made of love.” That’s where the story begins. A story that teaches of the tie that really binds. Moms (and Pops) feel the tug whenever kids give it; and kids feel the tug that comes right back: the Invisible String reaches from heart to heart. Does everybody have an Invisible String? How far does it reach, anyway? Does it ever go away? Read all about it!

 

 

A Terrible Thing Happened

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Sherman Smith saw the most terrible thing happen. At first he tried to forget about it, but soon something inside him started to bother him. He felt nervous for no reason. Sometimes his stomach hurt. He had bad dreams. And he started to feel angry and do mean things, which got him in trouble. Then he met Ms. Maple, who helped him talk about the terrible thing that he had tried to forget. Now Sherman is feeling much better. This gently told and tenderly illustrated story is for children who have witnessed any kind of violent or traumatic episode, including physical abuse, school or gang violence, accidents, homicide, suicide, and natural disasters such as floods or fire. An afterword by Sasha J. Mudlaff written for parents and other caregivers offers extensive suggestions for helping traumatized children, including a list of other sources that focus on specific events.

I Miss You

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When a close friend or family member dies, it can be difficult for children to express their feelings. I Miss You helps boys and girls understand that death is a natural complement to life, and that grief and a sense of loss are normal feelings for them to have following a loved one’s death. Titles in the sensitively presented A First Look At series explore the dynamics of various relationships experienced by children of preschool through early school age. Kids are encouraged to understand personal feelings and social problems as a first step in dealing with them. Written by psychotherapist and counselor Pat Thomas, these books promote positive interaction among children, parents, and teachers. The story lines are simple and direct–easily accessible to younger children.

I’ll Always Love You

“In this gentle, moving story, Elfie, a dachshund, and her special boy progress happily through life together. One morning Elfie does not wake up. The family grieves and buries her. The watercolor illustrations, tender and warm in color and mood, suit the simple text perfectly.” – School Library Journal.

Is Daddy Coming Back in a Minute

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When we were on a No Girls Allowed! holiday, my daddy’s heart stopped beating and I had to find help all by myself. He was very badly broken. Not even the ambulance people could help him… This honest, sensitive and beautifully illustrated picture book is designed to help explain the concept of death to children aged 3+. Written in Alex’s own words, it is based on the real-life conversations that Elke Barber had with her then three-year-old son, Alex, after the sudden death of his father. The book provides reassurance and understanding to readers through clear and honest answers to the difficult questions that can follow the death of a loved one, and carries the invaluable message that it is okay to be sad, but it is okay to be happy, too.

Let’s Talk About When Someone Dies

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From Molly Potter, best-selling author of How Are You Feeling Today? and What’s Worrying You?, comes a picture book for starting conversations with children about death, bereavement and what happens next. When someone dies, we can feel a whole host of different emotions and explaining them to a child isn’t so easy. This book uses clear, easy-to-understand language to answer complex questions about death and how a child might feel when someone dies. It covers all manner of tricky subjects with sensitivity and honesty, from what death is to why people die. Each double page spread takes a child through how they might feel, what they might think and how they might behave. With engaging illustrations, gentle guidance and simple advice for parents and carers, Let’s Talk About When Someone Dies fulfils an important but difficult need for starting conversations with children about death and bereavement, in an accessible and supportive way.

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